For those who don’t know it, VeraCrypt is the successor of the wildly popular encryption software TrueCrypt, whose development stopped a couple of years ago, apparently after the introduction of the BitLocker functionality in Windows 7 and 8.

The biggest advantage of something like TrueCrypt lied in the fact that it was multi-platform, unlike its Microsoft counterpart. VeraCrypt is also multi-platform (it’s available on Windows, Mac and Linux) and has an additional advantage over TrueCrypt, being open source which, for a Security product, is always good news (for those of you who are wondering, TrueCrypt wasn’t really open source as it had a very particular license, as you can read in its Wikipedia page).

Anyway, installing VeraCrypt on Windows is very straightforward (it’s the typical Next-Next-Next-Finish process), but if you want to use it on Mac OS, you need an additional piece of software to make this work (not that it makes the process any more difficult anyway, but still it’s good to have here for reference).

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