TagEncryption

Is Your FreeNAS Pool Encrypted With AES-XTS 128?

I have recently upgraded my pool of mirrors to double my storage space and, upon rebooting the machine, I received this email from the FreeNAS server:

freenas.local kernel log messages:
> GEOM_ELI: Device ada0p1.eli destroyed.
> GEOM_ELI: Detached ada0p1.eli on last close.
> GEOM_ELI: Device ada2p1.eli created.
> GEOM_ELI: Encryption: AES-XTS 128
> GEOM_ELI: Crypto: software
> GEOM_ELI: Device ada1p1.eli destroyed.
> GEOM_ELI: Detached ada1p1.eli on last close.
> GEOM_ELI: Device ada3p1.eli created.
> GEOM_ELI: Encryption: AES-XTS 128
> GEOM_ELI: Crypto: software

-- End of security output --

The interesting thing is that I have never enabled encryption for this pool, so this looked weird.

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Using a Comodo Free Email Cert In macOS Sierra

Comodo offer free email certificates, which is awesome as email is an inherently insecure method of communication. So, if you were toying with the idea of playing around with email encryption and signing, you have no more excuses now.

Getting the free cert to work on macOS, however, might be tricky if you don’t pay attention to a couple of things. Here are the pitfalls I have encountered in the process and how I was able to fix them.

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How To Install VeraCrypt On Mac OS X

For those who don’t know it, VeraCrypt is the successor of the wildly popular encryption software TrueCrypt, whose development stopped a couple of years ago, apparently after the introduction of the BitLocker functionality in Windows 7 and 8.

The biggest advantage of something like TrueCrypt lied in the fact that it was multi-platform, unlike its Microsoft counterpart. VeraCrypt is also multi-platform (it’s available on Windows, Mac and Linux) and has an additional advantage over TrueCrypt, being open source which, for a Security product, is always good news (for those of you who are wondering, TrueCrypt wasn’t really open source as it had a very particular license, as you can read in its Wikipedia page).

Anyway, installing VeraCrypt on Windows is very straightforward (it’s the typical Next-Next-Next-Finish process), but if you want to use it on Mac OS, you need an additional piece of software to make this work (not that it makes the process any more difficult anyway, but still it’s good to have here for reference).

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See Detailed Disk Information From The Terminal On Mac OS X

I was already familiar with the diskutil command in Mac OS, which basically just returns a list of physical and logical partitions of drives connected to your Mac (both internal and external).

But today I found out about an even more useful command to see detailed disk information using Mac OS X’s Terminal: diskutil cs list.

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WhatsApp Enables Seamless End-to-End Encryption To All Conversations

If you use WhatsApp (likely perhaps?) you probably started noticing messages like the following popping up in all your conversations starting yesterday:

WhatsApp encryption activation message: Messages you send to this chat and calls are now secured with end-to-end encryption. Tap for more info.

Messages you send to this chat and calls are now secured with end-to-end encryption. Tap for more info.

This is a good thing, especially after many users started becoming aware of the existence of the secret chat feature of WhatsApp rival app Telegram. At least, Telegram should be thanked for making more users think about their digital communications a little bit, if only for making them realize that, if you could turn on a chat encryption feature, perhaps by default your communications were not that secure.

Of course, WhatsApp now belongs to Facebook, not exactly a company that has the utmost interest in your privacy, but this is definitely a nice step towards making the average feel more secure when they use their app. Is this enough though?

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